?

Log in

No account? Create an account
 
 
03 May 2005 @ 05:59 pm
Music, books, film  

Unfortunately the weather on 'Koninginnedag' (30 April) was not half as good as predicted, but Sunday was warm and glorious. In the morning I went for a walk in the park. In the afternoon I first watched an energetic Franz Ferdinand concert on TV, recorded live at Pinkpop last year (I really must buy their CD), and when the sun had left my garden I sat outside reading until 7. My rumbling stomach finally drove me back inside to make dinner.

Recently I read a raving review of Extremely loud & incredibly close by Jonathan Safran Foer and I had planned to go out yesterday afternoon to check it out at the bookshop. As luck would have it, the chapter I read in So many books, so little time yesterday morning dealt with hypes. Sara Nelson specifically mentioned Safran Foer's first book Everything is illuminated, and that she felt a resistance to it because it had been hyped so much. She liked it, but didn't think it was all that brilliant.

So it was with slightly curbed enthusiasm that I set out to the bookshops. It didn't take long for me to surrender to EL&IC, though. Intriguing illustrations and layout, not as weird as House of leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski (another hyped book I couldn't resist at the time), but interesting enough. So even if the story or the style of writing turn out to be disappointing, at least it's a good-looking book.

And this morning I rolled out of bed to watch L'une chante, l'autre pas by Agnès Varda on TV5. It must be at least 20, maybe even 25 years since I last saw it, and when I checked the new TV guide last week I was overjoyed to see the announcement. Later I suddenly remembered that I was scheduled for an appointment with the dental hygienist at the same time the film would be on, so I immediately called her to postpone it. It is important to get one's priorities right.

Image Hosted by ImageShack.us

L'une chante, l'autre pas is typically '70s. That era was great for film, and especially for European cinema. Most of my favourites date back to that time, although that could have more to do with my being an impressionable teenager then. I still loved the film today, though.


 
 
Current Mood: optimisticoptimistic
Current Music: Song for Sharon - Joni Mitchell
 
 
 
Magnus Melkadelberttapir on May 3rd, 2005 09:24 pm (UTC)
Didn't realize you have so many years behind you now. ;)


Mnemosyne_lethe_ on May 3rd, 2005 10:11 pm (UTC)
Yes, I am ancient! But I can hardly believe it myself. I feel more like 27. ;)
trop_vaniteusetrop_vaniteuse on May 4th, 2005 02:46 am (UTC)
Unfortunately the weather on 'Koninginnedag' (30 April) was not half as good as predicted, but Sunday was warm and glorious.

Aha! This is why my boy's been unusually wistful of late, and why he was pleased at finding a shop near him that sold Gizeh papers. (His favorite spot was De Boot, and that's all they had there, he tells me) He inadvertently planned his first trip to coincide with Koninginnedag and was swept into the festivities, where he made many good friends. Some of whom he didn't remember when he saw them in ensuing days. :-X

It also explains why he actually said something nice about my Dutch after hurling gutterals over the phone at me for an hour and a half last night; he did confess to being horribly biased, though.

I fell asleep listening to my Dutch CD course, and I've come to the conclusion that my Dutch pronunciation is pretty much acceptable...I just don't sound like I'm from Utrecht, like he tries to (he probably does it well, but I can't judge), so he's harder on me. And not too long ago, I was in turn hard on him for not knowing what "piemelnaakt" meant! :-)
Mnemosyne: smile!_lethe_ on May 5th, 2005 09:32 pm (UTC)
Ah, I'm proud of you! ;-)

The Utrecht accent is very funny, among other things they interchange the pronunciation of 'a' and 'aa'.

Was your boy here last year?
trop_vaniteusetrop_vaniteuse on May 6th, 2005 04:16 am (UTC)
:-)

Indeed he was. If I remember correctly, he got back in late June.

And I'll let him know you think the accent's funny. He did make sure I pronounced "aa" correctly in "piemelnaakt." So I guess he's not as much of an Utrecht badass as he would think. What are some other funny things about it?

He's told me to give you a call and ask you to say "squirrel." He's noticed a lot of the Dutch have trouble saying it -- I'd give a guess for the corresponding reasons "huis" and "uit" give me trouble. (I can speak what I know of it well enough...until I see it spelled out. I'm getting better with that, though.) I'm fairly certain you'd have no problems at all with one of Jersey's finest examples of fauna, though. :-)
Mnemosyne: smile!_lethe_ on May 8th, 2005 11:25 pm (UTC)
There are other characteristics, but the only thing I can think of is that instead of "hartje" they say "haartsie". Don't know if they do that to all the "tje's", though.

Thank you for believing in me. ;-) I think my pronunciation of "squirrel" is all right, but it is a difficult word.
So, Jersey has many squirrels, then?
heartofdavid: bti bananaheartofdavid on May 5th, 2005 12:57 pm (UTC)
My rumbling stomach finally drove me back inside to make dinner

Probably scared a few passersby as well...

Sara Nelson specifically mentioned Safran Foer's first book Everything is illuminated, and that she felt a resistance to it because it had been hyped so much. She liked it, but didn't think it was all that brilliant.

How is Nelson's book? Entertaining? Does she mention any books that she thinks are great but that you think are 'not so great'?


Mnemosyne_lethe_ on May 5th, 2005 10:20 pm (UTC)
Nelson's book is definitely entertaining, she writes about her family, and why and how specific books are relevant to her life situation. Most of the books she discusses so far (I've now reached August 20) I have not read, except The hours by Michael Cunningham, which she didn't care for (neither did I); A home at the end of the world by same, which she loved, and I didn't, in fact I stopped reading after about 70 pages or so; and when contemplating which book to take to a weekend outing at the beach with "smart, educated professional women" she almost takes one of my all-time favourite books, Housekeeping by Marilynne Robinson, "supposedly a feminist landmark" (huh?), but decides against it because it "started off slowly" (huh?).

She describes herself as "low-culture", but she is also quite snobbish: in public she reads books with "show-off potential", because "people notice what you read and judge you by it". Well, she certainly does, she finds it almost impossible to be friends with people who rave about what she finds bad books. But at least she is honest about it, and there is a certain amount of tongue-in-cheek and self-mockery there.