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Pope in his grotto
It's clever, but is it art?
(This is your life, and it's ending one minute at a time.)
 
Devil: Temptation
Finished To Reign in Hell. The premise was really interesting, but I'm not so sure about the execution... I'm afraid Brust has rather reminded me why I don't generally read sci-fi or fantasy novels. Like so many of them, this one came off more like a really excellent fanfic than like a professional work, I thought. I found it particularly jarring in this case because of how blatantly similar Brust's style is to Zelazny's, yet without being anywhere near as polished or natural as Zelazny is. But besides that, his writing just felt very rushed to me, a bit haphazard, a bit heavyhanded... I mean, I realize it's hard to deal with messiahs and gods and damnation without being heavyhanded, and Brust sure as hell could easily have done much, much worse. But --

Well, enough skirting around spoilers. On to the review.Collapse )

This turned out a bit rantier than I intended. I didn't actually hate the book or anything -- I'm just disappointed because it had so much potential, and I feel like Brust could have done a lot better with such rich material. I'd be willing to try another of his books sometime, though. This one was certainly a quick read, in any case.
23rd-Dec-2007 03:29 pm - This year's reading list...
Devil: the dark side has books
(I wrote this a few days ago, thinking I'd be able to get online sooner. It's therefore a bit outdated; I've actually finished reading Moby Dick now, and a post about that is forthcoming. In the meantime, I'm leaving this post as it is.)

Contrary to what most people think, I'm not actually a very prolific reader. At all. In fact, I've read exactly ten books this year -- or eleven, if I finish Moby Dick before January -- and that includes three short children's novels. I mean, I read pieces of other things… I read about half of a collection of Nathaniel Hawthorne's short stories, several chapters of The House of the Seven Gables, the first quarter of The 1,001 Arabian Nights (which I'm still reading; at the moment I'm about halfway through the story of Aladdin), and a few chapters of The Iliad, The Red and the Black, and Nietzsche's Antichrist. I intend to finish reading all of these at some point... hopefully within the coming year...

In any case. Some of you have been trying to "read your height" in books, or read a book for every week of the year, or something of that sort, and then commenting on those books in your journal in little blocks. I've entered on no such ambitious enterprise, but now that the year is out, I figure I'll take a moment to comment briefly on the books I did manage to read this year. No spoilers, or at least only very minor, oblique spoilers. In the order in which I read them, then:

The Master and MargaritaCollapse )
LolitaCollapse )
One Hundred Years of SolitudeCollapse )
The Dark Tower: The GunslingerCollapse )
Number the StarsCollapse )
The Devil's StorybookCollapse )
The Devil's Other StorybookCollapse )
Lord of LightCollapse )
Harry Potter and the Deathly HallowsCollapse )
Guards! Guards!Collapse )
Moby DickCollapse )
Marlowe: "bad revolting stars?"
All right, well, having survived yet another Chemistry exam and yet another Russian exam, I'm back to have another go at April Poetry Month... and having, on a whim prompted by hamsterwoman, mocked the Millay poem I posted a few days ago, I now bring you another Millay poem, this one concerning Euclid, along with a humorous riposte-poem by Roger Zelazny, concerning Nikolai Ivanovich Lobachevsky (who developed non-Euclidean geometry). Always falling in with the Russians, that Zelazny, isn't he? ;)

So, for you lovers of mathematics -- behold, poems of geekery. Actually, the first is quite chastely magnificent, and the second, quite roguishly fun. Have a look. I, meanwhile, am off to sleep.

Euclid Alone Has Looked On Beauty BareCollapse )
And in reply:
Lobachevsky's EyesCollapse )
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