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_53
21 June 2011 @ 02:14 am
If you could find out what happens after you die, would you want to know?


SPOILER ALERT: Nothing happens after you die, except you become worm food. It's irrelevant. What's really important is what you do with your life before that happens.

I have seen no evidence or argument that's pro-afterlife that makes any sense, aside from it being an imaginary idea that people have concocted up because they're too scared of death to face reality. Not only is there no scientific proof of there being an afterlife of any kind, the very idea is ludicrous on its face. It's like a child asking you check for monsters under the bed or in the closet, and then demanding proof that said monsters do not exist, and claiming victory when you can't prove that said monsters do not exist.

Why should there be an afterlife of any kind, good or bad? What purpose would this serve? Do whales, dolphins, apes, elephants, cats and dogs also go to heaven? Why not? What about intelligent invertibrates like octopuses and cuttlefish? What about hell? And if so, is this restricted only to intelligent animals? What about rats and cockroaches? What about bacteria and viruses? Why are they unimportant? Who decides which lifeforms have a soul? What IS a soul? Can it even be defined? Is intelligence or sentient intelligence the defining factor here?

What if you're brain-dead? No brain activity whatsoever, no hope of recovery; but your body is still technically alive and breathing. Where's your soul then? What if you're mentally retarded and have the IQ of a goldfish? What if you're a child? What if you were aborted? Stillborn?

And what would you do in the afterlife? Exactly how would it not be terminally, mind-numbingly boring? What is the afterlife for? What function would it serve? What's the point?

Let's not even get into the whole idea of hell. I find it hilarious that so many people think there's life after death in some form, but reject the idea of hell. At least that's been my experience: "yeah, there must be something after this life, but I don't think hell is real." Well, why not? You believe in heaven, why not hell? You want the good, but not the bad?

What if you're a mass murderer? Is Jeffrey Dahmer chilling out in heaven with all the young boys he raped, tortured, murdered and ate? Technically he should be, because he apparently genuinely repented and accepted Christ as his savior just days before he was shanked in prison. The afterlife must be mighty awkward for him, I imagine.

Not to mention that the only real function of heaven and hell appears to be the carrot and the stick. "Be good and you'll go to heaven, but be bad and you'll burn in hell for eternity." It's like Christmas and Santa Claus making his list and checking it twice. You know, if you're a good little boy or girl you get gifts. Be bad and you get a lump of coal.

Except you grow out of that phase. With religion what you get is people being actively encouraged to ruin their lives because after all, this life is just a blink of an eye in the face of this supposed eternal bliss. God will reward you for all the fun you didn't have by not throwing you into hell.

Makes you wonder why one would WANT to spend eternity with a guy like that. Even my parents would never psychologically manipulate me like that, even if it really was for my own good. So if there was a heaven, would I really WANT to go there? Sounds odd that God would create me in his own image and whatnot, give me free will, and then punish me for using that free will. So it's a choice to follow or reject God, yes, in the same way that a rape victim with a gun to her forehead has a choice to disobey the rapist. Argue all you want whether rape or a bullet to the head (or both) is better, but don't try to tell me that victim is "free to choose."

Anyway, life is precious specifically because it's finite and the only one we have. I don't have a problem with this, because I'd rather live a full but short life than a long but empty, boring one, wouldn't you? The clock is ticking. Do something. Live. You're going to die anyway, what do you have to lose?
 
 
Current Location: at work
 
 
_53
18 February 2011 @ 12:54 am
If you could turn back time, how far back would you go?


I'd go back to just before I turned 16, and learn to actually chill the fuck out and realize I'm fine the way I am.
 
 
Current Location: NCR, India
Current Mood: caffeinated
 
 
 
_53
15 January 2011 @ 05:12 pm
Pics  
Just two quick pics of me and my beloved bike, the Phoenix, taken today for a newspaper article about cycling in Delhi :)



 
 
Current Mood: happy
 
 
_53
14 January 2011 @ 12:47 am
If you were to write your autobiography, what would be the title?


"No reason to live, but we like it that way." (From the Bloodhound Gang).
 
 
Current Mood: sick
 
 
 
_53
02 September 2009 @ 11:27 am

At just 49, Bruce Beach was diagnosed with a rare cancer, and in five years, he will probably be dead.

Until he felt its urgency, he never had much time for living. But mortality has given him renewed perspective. In the last two months Bruce has completed a source-to-sea quest down the River Thames in a canoe, and a three-week road trip around Scandinavia and Europe on a vintage motorcycle. He has recently recorded an album with his band, is preparing to play at London's famous 100 Club and, for good measure, has raised money for charity. By his own admission, when he was younger, Bruce was never one for living. "Things just got in the way, like work and bills," he says.


The problem exactly is that it takes a death sentence before most people truly live. I'm hoping I can get all my living done AND work a 9 to 5 and the rest of it AND do it all without getting cancer or AIDS or something to kick my ass and motivate me into living before it's all over.

I'm only 30, but really by most standards and basic math, I'm already close to the halfway point. And it's not like one can go bicycling to Mongolia and climbing mountains when you're 70 or so (I mean I guess you can, but it'll be much harder). The fact is that life is really, really fucking short, especially when you spend a lot of time procrastinating because you assume you have so much time to do it "later on someday." A wise someone said, "live like today is your last day on earth, plan for the future like you'll live to be 100."

This post is directed mostly at myself.
 
 
Current Location: north campus, new delhi
Current Mood: awake
Current Music: my to-be sisters in law chatting in manipuri
 
 
 
_53
How to discover your life purpose in about 20 - 60 minutes.
Via Lifehacker.

Blogger Steve Pavlina says that you can discover your life's purpose in as little as twenty minutes. To do so, complete the following four steps:

1. Take out a blank sheet of paper or open up a word processor where you can type.
2. Write at the top, "What is my true purpose in life?"
3. Write an answer (any answer) that pops into your head. It doesn't have to be a complete sentence. A short phrase is fine.
4. Repeat step 3 until you write the answer that makes you cry. This is your purpose.


Steve writes that "usually it takes 15-20 minutes to clear your head of all the clutter and the social conditioning about what you think your purpose in life is" and that you should expect to generate some repeats or similar answers. All this is fine so long as you keep on writing, even if your answers begin to resemble variations on "I don't have a purpose" or "Life is meaningless".

Also, it's not enough to react emotionally to an answer, according to Pavlina. You need to keep going until the emotion brings forth tears. If you feel the urge to quit, take a two minute break and then resume. According to the post, around 80-90 percent of those who try this method will reach their answer in less than an hour.


Lifehacker page.

It does sound too good to be true, and possibly bullshit; but it's worth a try, simply as an exercise to clear your head and deprogram yourself etc.
Tags: ,
 
 
Current Mood: curious
 
 
 
_53
11 February 2009 @ 02:56 am
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3436/3269582026_cddb342354_o.png

How not to fail at life. Stolen via rottenpieces.
 
 
Current Mood: amused
 
 
_53



Wiki:
Epicurus (Greek Έπίκουρος) (341 BCE, Samos – 270 BCE, Athens) was an ancient Greek philosopher and the founder of the school of philosophy called Epicureanism. For Epicurus, the purpose of philosophy was to attain the happy, tranquil life, characterized by aponia, the absence of pain and fear, and by living a self-sufficient life surrounded by friends. He taught that pleasure and pain are the measures of what is good and bad, that death is the end of the body and the soul and should therefore not be feared, that the gods do not reward or punish humans, that the universe is infinite and eternal, and that events in the world are ultimately based on the motions and interactions of atoms moving in empty space.

Epicurus is famous for his simple four line philosophical argument against the existence of God or gods, The Problem of Evil:

"Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able? Then he is not omnipotent. Is he able, but not willing? Then he is malevolent. Is he both able and willing? Then whence cometh evil? Is he neither able nor willing? Then why call him God?"

But many of his other quotes and philosophy on the meaning of life and answering questions about moral hedonism, pleasure, fear of divine retribution and death are more than notable.

Here are a few of his quotes that are right now kicking my ass in very real, practical ways. I am so glad I've come across these writings. Here are some I'm putting down here, more for my own reference than anything else.

Do not spoil what you have by desiring what you have not; remember that what you now have was once among the things you only hoped for.

Death, therefore, the most awful of evils, is nothing to us, seeing that, when we are, death is not come, and, when death is come, we are not.

A happy and eternal being has no trouble himself and brings no trouble upon any other being; hence he is exempt from movements of anger and partiality, for every such movement implies weakness.

It is impossible to live a pleasant life without living wisely and honorably and justly, and it is impossible to live wisely and honorably and justly without living pleasantly.

No pleasure is in itself evil, but the things which produce certain pleasures entail annoyances many times greater than the pleasures themselves.
 
 
Current Mood: happy
 
 
 
_53
19 September 2008 @ 03:09 am
Quote from inspirethoughts:

We do not stop playing because we are old; we grow old because we stop playing.
 
 
Current Mood: awake
 
 
_53
01 September 2008 @ 12:32 am
Friedrich Nietzsche:

But thus do I counsel you, my friends: distrust all in whom the impulse to punish is powerful!

Without music, life would be a mistake.

What does not destroy me, makes me stronger.

Some are born posthumously.

"Faith" means not wanting to know what is true.

Here the ways of men part: if you wish to strive for peace of soul and pleasure, then believe; if you wish to be a devotee of truth, then inquire.

I cannot believe in a God who wants to be praised all the time.

We have art in order not to die of the truth.

The mother of excess is not joy but joylessness.

The surest way to corrupt a youth is to instruct him to hold in higher esteem those who think alike than those who think differently.

You have evolved from worm to man, but much within you is still worm. Once you were apes, yet even now man is more of an ape than any of the apes.

I tell you: one must have chaos within oneself, to give birth to a dancing star.

There is always some madness in love. But there is also always some reason in madness.

What is done out of love always takes place beyond good and evil.


Epicurus:

Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able?
Then he is not omnipotent.
Is he able, but not willing?
Then he is malevolent.
Is God both able and willing?
Then whence cometh evil?
Is he neither able nor willing?
Then why call him God?

Death, therefore, the most awful of evils, is nothing to us, seeing that, when we are, death is not come, and, when death is come, we are not.

No pleasure is itself a bad thing, but the things that produce some kinds of pleasure, bring along with them unpleasantness that is much greater than the pleasure itself.

Do not spoil what you have by desiring what you have not; remember that what you now have was once among the things you only hoped for.

We begin every act of choice and avoidance from pleasure, and it is to pleasure that we return using our experience of pleasure as the criterion of every good thing.


Robert Ingersoll:

There are in nature neither rewards nor punishments — there are only consequences.

Happiness is not a reward — it is a consequence. Suffering is not a punishment — it is a result.

An infinite God ought to be able to protect himself, without going in partnership with State Legislatures.

If the book the Bible and my brain are both the work of the same Infinite God, whose fault is it that the book and my brain do not agree?

Would God give a bird wings and make it a crime to fly? Would he give me brains and make it a crime to think? Any God that would damn one of his children for the expression of his honest thought wouldn't make a decent thief. When I read a book and don't believe it, I ought to say so. I will do so and take the consequences like a man.

Martyrdom, as a rule, establishes the sincerity of the martyr, — never the correctness of his thought.

Every library is an arsenal.


Richard Dawkins:

You've just said a very revealing thing. Are you telling me that the only reason you don't steal and rape and murder is that you're frightened of God?

Science is the poetry of reality.


Christopher Hitchens:

What can be asserted without proof can be dismissed without proof.

Exceptional claims require exceptional evidence.

Nothing proves the man-made character of religion as obviously as the sick mind that designed hell, unless it is the sorely limited mind that has failed to describe heaven-except as a place of either wordly comfort, eternal tedium, or (as Tertullian thought) continual relish in the torture of others.

Religion has run out of justifications.


Sam Harris:

By failing to live by the letter of the texts, while tolerating the irrationality of those who do, religious moderates betray faith and reason equally.
 
 
Current Mood: accomplished