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Ever got the impression that Grant Morrison is truly comics-style insane? He has a well-known penchant for (and I think, a literal belief in) modern versions of magic, so maybe his comics are less art than performative magic — changing the shape of reality by changing the shape of stories, microcosm-vs-macrocosm, Borgesian Kabbalah, etc. That's even the underpinning of his own stories, isn't it? That's how the universes he writes work: comics in his world are windows to other realities (remember the Multiversity).

So maybe he thinks that's how it works.

And you know how in pretty much every one of his big events there's some sort of almost extra-universal (extra-textual) force trying to kill everything? Maybe that's part of him. Maybe there's a part of him that wants to destroy the very archetypal plane of comics (can that be any different from wanting to destroying everything, given his metaphysics?), maybe that's most of him, and the only way he can prevent himself from doing it is with the help of all the characters.

Maybe his comics are one continuous retelling and re-fighting of his battle against a part of himself he doesn't think he can defeat, but he invokes Batman and Superman and everybody else and then he does. Who knows what he thinks would happen to his mind if he wrote and got published a true end of everything.

Who knows what he thinks would happen to comics as a genre (can you keep writing Batman comics after all Batmen in all universes have been corrupted and killed? no, no you can't).

Who knows what he thinks would happen to all realities, including our own.

Maybe he keeps telling that story because he keeps feeling a thing trying to break in from Outside the universe through the weakest spot of the barrier, our minds.

And because words have their own logic and I'm a sucker for certain patterns, I have to add without believing it (not that he'd think it makes a difference): maybe he's right.


ETA: This is about a mostly-fictional Grant Morrison inside my head, as I know very little about the man. But he does talk about this kind of magic in more or less serious terms, and he does write this kind of thing more or less all the time, and increasingly so. It'd take somebody with much more self-restraint than I have not to go there with that kind of set up.

Injection #2

It's such a Warren Ellis work in conception, dialogue, and pacing that the name on the cover is almost ridiculously redundant. That's the best reason for or against reading it, depending on your tastes.

One thing of note: his use of non-dialogue text is quite interesting, somewhat similar in spirit to his Moon Knight run. Not as out there as more experimental comics, but he's probably one of the current relatively well-known comic book writers that focuses the most on fiddling with media possibilities in general (his email newsletter is often a record of what he's reading and thinking about, and although I don't share many of his interests, he's clearly a reflective and inquisitive writer).

As an aside, Morrison's Nameless #4 is also pure late Morrison, which means it's a deranged excursion into forces of reality-destroying supernatural evil.

You know, the transition between Morrison's early JLA and Morrison's Final Crisis could be described as going from professionals so badass they become legendary to legends so legendary they become godlike. A movement from tactical engineering to hermeneutical magic, if you will.

Quick catchup with comics

Neither is a masterpiece, but this week's Pax Americana is an almost perfect example of Grant Morrison's style (taking existing characters and plots and reworking them with Baroque levels of multi-layered symmetry and meta-narrative meaning) (although perhaps Morrison has gone past the line of diminishing returns on this), while Brian Wood's Moon Knight #9 is kind of brilliant, looking at first like it's just staging a more nuanced version of the old "should vigilantes kill?" argument, but then going somewhere with the story that it's just *fantastic*, and could only happen in comics (no, seriously, the more I think about it, the more I like it, and wish I had written something like that).Neither is a masterpiece, but this week's Pax Americana is an almost perfect example of Grant Morrison's style (taking existing characters and plots and reworking them with Baroque levels of multi-layered symmetry and meta-narrative meaning) (although perhaps Morrison has gone past the line of diminishing returns on this), while Brian Wood's Moon Knight #9 is kind of brilliant, looking at first like it's just staging a more nuanced version of the old "should vigilantes kill?" argument, but then going somewhere with the story that it's just *fantastic*, and could only happen in comics (no, seriously, the more I think about it, the more I like it, and wish I had written something like that).

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