__marcelo (__marcelo) wrote,
__marcelo
__marcelo

Everything Dies

I'm following Hickman's New Avengers arc, Everything Dies. On one hand, the actual premise is quite interesting: what if everything is, indeed, dying, and the only way to get a few more hours or days for your world involves each time doing something soul-crushing, something that denies you the opportunity of seeing yourself as a hero? What does that to people who have come to need to see themselves in that light? [*] The Wheel grinds, as the Black Swan says. And I like some of the elements Hickman has added to the Marvel cosmology. Not so much Builders and so on, but the Mapmakers are cool, and also make sense.

Problem is, nothing's going to change, and we know it. There will be a way out. (Unless there isn't, and this is the end of 616, but no way Marvel will do that --- they haven't even destroyed the Ultimate universe so far, although hope is eternal --- and I think Reed would love the Mapmakers, but I digress).

Everything Dies is precisely the kind of story that would work best in an universe where things can happen. Hickman did something interesting with Red Mass for Mars (and I loved Pax Romana and sort-of liked the other time travel one), and a self-contained arc about the moral choices involved would have been interesting, if handled with more curiosity than grim-and-grit.

Heck, you can play it with Earth's death being the beginning of the larger human civilization, not its end. You *should* play it that way.

[*] I'm ignoring the eight way to avoid doom, Shadowing the Apocalypse; it's too easy a way out for them, and the fact that they aren't using it is, on itself, disappointing.
Tags: comics, hickman
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