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universetoday July 31 2014, 13:07

Stargazing Timelapse Plus Apollo 14 Launch Soundtrack Is Pure Magic

http://www.universetoday.com/113593/stargazing-timelapse-plus-apollo-14-launch-soundtrack-is-pure-magic/

http://www.universetoday.com/?p=113593

It feels like a real stargazing session watching this video. You head out at dusk, waiting for the first few stars to emerge. Then there’s a moment when — if you’re in the right spot — whammo. The Milky Way pops out. The sky turns into a three-dimensional playground.

Combine that feeling with the Apollo 14 launch audio from 1971, and this timelapse is a lot of fun.

(...)
Read the rest of Stargazing Timelapse Plus Apollo 14 Launch Soundtrack Is Pure Magic (56 words)


© Elizabeth Howell for Universe Today, 2014. | Permalink | No comment |
Post tags: Apollo 14, Timelapse, video

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universetoday July 31 2014, 13:07

If You Mine An Asteroid, Who Does The Property Belong To?

http://www.universetoday.com/113594/if-you-mine-an-asteroid-who-does-the-property-belong-to/

http://www.universetoday.com/?p=113594

An astronaut retrieves a sample from an asteroid in this artist's conception. Credit: NASA

An astronaut retrieves a sample from an asteroid in this artist’s conception. Credit: NASA

There have been several proposals in recent months to visit asteroids — NASA is talking about sending astronauts to an asteroid sometime, and both Planetary Resources and Deep Space Industries have outlined distant plans to mine these space rocks for resources.

But once the stuff is extracted, who does it belong to? A bill being considered by the U.S. House of Representatives says it would belong to “the property of the entity that obtained such resources.”

(...)
Read the rest of If You Mine An Asteroid, Who Does The Property Belong To? (255 words)


© Elizabeth Howell for Universe Today, 2014. | Permalink | No comment |
Post tags: asteroid mining, dep space industries, newspace 2014, Planetary Resources

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rhodielady_47 posted to gardening July 31 2014, 01:32

Does Anyone Have a Recipe For Deer and Rabbit Repellant?

I really need this recipe.
I can't believe how much they want for the liquid fence stuff at the store and I need to apply about a gallon of it at a time.
I doubt my neighbors will tolerate me squalling bloody murder at the deer AGAIN while I chase them out of my yard.
Not even once more.
I used some of my sailor father's World War Two Naval Language on the deer which I reserve for use only during times of greatest stress.
I've already apologized but...
{{{Sigh.}}}
stanford_encyc July 31 2014, 00:21

Hermann von Helmholtz

http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/hermann-helmholtz/

[Revised entry by Lydia Patton on July 31, 2014.
Changes to: Main text, Bibliography
Changes to: Main text, Bibliography]
Hermann von Helmholtz (1821 - 1894) participated in two of the most significant developments in physics and in the philosophy of science in the 19th century: the proof that Euclidean geometry does not describe the only possible visualizable and physical space, and...
shaved_ape posted to moviebuffs July 31 2014, 00:10

Milk, Marley, The Filth & The Fury

Documentaries & Biopics:

MILK is the story of Harvey Milk, the self-proclaimed 'Mayor Of Castro Street' and first openly homosexual man to hold elected office in the United States. To my eyes it is shocking that this was only in the 1970s. The film opens with police openly brutalising gay men in the street. Harvey Milk rises to public office on the back of years of campaigning against discrimination. The film (starring Sean Penn) balances the human story with the social campaigns of the time. The biggest fight of all was against the backlash of the religious right who wanted to repeal all civil rights for gay men and women. Harvey Milk played a key role in the important struggles of the period and continued to do so until he was shot and killed.
Milk has a great cast and is a wonderful window into life at that particular time and place - it deserves to be widely seen.

MARLEY documents the life and times of the reggae star from his modest origins to his global superstardom and untimely death. Interviews with those who knew him best are cut with plenty of archive footage to reveal the world he lived in and helped to change. The soundtrack unsurprisingly is amazing. The film helped me understand the impact Bob Marley had globally with his music and even his philosophy.

THE FILTH & THE FURY: This documentary about British punk group, The Sex Pistols takes its name from a newspaper headline written about them at the time. This group, because of their prominence within the punk movement at the time often filled pages of British tabloid journalism. There is some debate as to whether punks in general (and the Sex Pistols in particular) should be regarded as the anti-establishment rebels they were claimed to be or whether they were just manufactured for the main purpose of making money. The film uses interviews from the band members then and now alongside great archive footage and other sources to try to shed some light on the bands brief, controversial career (and ultural impact).

All three films offer a glimpse into a world which wasnt that long ago but is already a very different place.
universetoday July 30 2014, 22:02

Early Tidal and Rotational Forces Helped Shape Moon

http://www.universetoday.com/113588/early-tidal-and-rotational-forces-shaped-moon/

http://www.universetoday.com/?p=113588

Using a precision formation-flying technique, the twin GRAIL spacecraft will map the moon's gravity field, as depicted in this artist's rendering. Radio signals traveling between the two spacecraft provide scientists the exact measurements required as well as flow of information not interrupted when the spacecraft are at the lunar farside, not seen from Earth. The result should be the most accurate gravity map of the moon ever made. The mission also will answer longstanding questions about Earth's moon, including the size of a possible inner core, and it should provide scientists with a better understanding of how Earth and other rocky planets in the solar system formed. GRAIL is a part of NASA's Discovery Program. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

An artist’s conception of how the twin GRAIL spacecraft map the moon’s gravity field. Image credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech

The shape of the moon deviates from a simple sphere in a way that scientists have struggled to explain. But new research shows that tidal forces during the moon’s early history can explain most of its large-scale topography. As the moon cooled and solidified more than four billion years ago, the sculpting effects of tidal and rotational forces became frozen in place.(...)
Read the rest of Early Tidal and Rotational Forces Helped Shape Moon (500 words)


© Shannon Hall for Universe Today, 2014. | Permalink | One comment |
Post tags: Moon's Evolution, Moon's Formation, tidal forces

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audrey_e posted to moviebuffs July 30 2014, 21:44

22: Maps to the Sars

Originally posted by audrey_e at Movie 12: Maps to the Sars
12 MAPS TO THE STARS (Canada/US, 2014)
Dir: David Cronenberg
Cast: Julianne Moore, Mia Wasikowska, Evan Bird, John Cusack, Robert Pattinson...

41maps

Hollywood stardom has dangerous psychological consequences.

I'm far from being a fan of David Cronenberg; I find A History of Violence and A Dangerous Method to be two of the most ridiculous-in-a-not-funny-way movies I've ever seen, but the quality of Maps to the Stars' acting should seduce even those who struggle with its director.
Mia Wasikowska really shines as a mysterious teenager with a dark past, and Julianne Moore demonstrates the extent of her talent as an aging, schizophrenic actress.
Maps to the Stars is a satire that fully embraces its genre, while A History of Violence offers elements of the satire, but eventually takes itself too seriously and becomes ridiculous. This movie explores different layers of Hollywood insanity (expensive therapists, ruthless competition, drug abuse, boring franchises...) with the crazy and dark sense of humor it needs.
I must admit I would have preferred a more conclusive ending, but I thoroughly enjoyed this cast of insane characters from beginning to end.

4/5
universetoday July 30 2014, 18:25

Mysterious Molecules in Space Named?

http://www.universetoday.com/113573/mysterious-molecules-in-space-named/

http://www.universetoday.com/?p=113573

The diffuse interstellar bands. Image Credit: P. Jenniskens, F. X. Desert

The diffuse interstellar bands. Image Credit: P. Jenniskens, F. X. Desert

It’s a well-kept secret that the vacuum of space is not — technically speaking — a vacuum. Strong winds generated from supernova explosions push material into the interstellar medium, tainting space with the heavier elements generated by nuclear fusion. These lonely molecules account for a significant amount of all the hydrogen, carbon, silicon, and other atoms in the Universe.

Although these molecules remain mysterious, since we don’t know their exact chemical composition or atomic arrangements, they’re likely the cause of diffuse interstellar bands: unknown fingerprints within the spectra of distant astronomical objects.

New research, however, offers a tantalizing new possibility: these mysterious molecules may be silicon hydrocarbons.(...)
Read the rest of Mysterious Molecules in Space Named? (282 words)


© Shannon Hall for Universe Today, 2014. | Permalink | No comment |
Post tags: Diffuse Interstellar Bands, Interstellar Molecules

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universetoday July 30 2014, 17:55

ALMA Observes Binary Star System with Wacky Disks

http://www.universetoday.com/113556/alma-observes-binary-star-system-with-wacky-disks/

http://www.universetoday.com/?p=113556

ALMA data of HK Tau shown in a composite image with Hubble infrared and optical data. Credit: B. Saxton (NRAO/AUI/NSF); K. Stapelfeldt et al. (NASA/ESA Hubble)

ALMA data of HK Tau shown in a composite image with Hubble infrared and optical data. Image Credit: B. Saxton / K. Stapelfeldt et al. / NASA / ESA

When it comes to exoplanets, we’ve discovered an array of extremes — alien worlds that seem more like science fiction than reality. But there are few environments more extreme than a binary star system in which planet formation can occur. Powerful gravitational perturbations from the two stars can easily grind a planet to dust, let alone prevent it from forming in the first place.

A new study has uncovered a striking pair of wildly misaligned planet-forming disks in the young binary star system HK Tau. It’s the clearest picture ever of protoplanetary disks around a double star, shedding light on the birth and eventual orbit of the planets in a multiple star system.

(...)
Read the rest of ALMA Observes Binary Star System with Wacky Disks (591 words)


© Shannon Hall for Universe Today, 2014. | Permalink | One comment |
Post tags: ALMA, protoplanetary disks

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