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universetoday August 21 2014, 15:46

Earth’s Ozone Under Attack Despite Banning Destructive Compound: Study

http://www.universetoday.com/114052/earths-ozone-under-attack-despite-banning-destructive-compound-study/

http://www.universetoday.com/?p=114052

The ozone hole over Antarctica on Aug. 18, 2014. Purple and blue represent zones with the least ozone, while yellow and red show thicker areas. Data sources come from multiple NASA, European Space Agency and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration satellites. Credit: NASA

The ozone hole over Antarctica on Aug. 18, 2014. Purple and blue represent zones with the least ozone, while yellow and red show thicker areas. Data sources come from multiple NASA, European Space Agency and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration satellites. Credit: NASA

Some bad news in the fight to protect Earth’s ozone — one of the banned compounds that attacks this protective atmospheric layer is still being produced, somehow.

That compound is called carbon tetrachloride, which used to be common in fire extinguishers and dry cleaning. But those who have signed the Montreal Protocol in 1987 reported no new emissions between 2007 and 2012.

So how is it that new research found atmospheric emissions are persisting at 30% of peak production, even with no new emissions being reported?

(...)
Read the rest of Earth’s Ozone Under Attack Despite Banning Destructive Compound: Study (129 words)


© Elizabeth Howell for Universe Today, 2014. | Permalink | No comment |
Post tags: carbon tetrachloride

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fatpie42 posted to moviebuffs August 20 2014, 20:35

"Guardians of the Galaxy" Has A Generic Plot and Shallow Characters, But It's Still Fun...


Guardians Of The Galaxy (2014)


Remember how in the mid-credits sequence at the end of Thor 2, Benicio Del Toro explains that the Ether was just one of six planet-destroying magic stones? Well it turns out he wasn't kidding. Here in "Guardians of the Galaxy" they really do just find another sparkly magic rock with very little to distinguish it from the one we found in 'Avengers' and the one we found in 'Thor 2'. And speaking of indistinguishable, we also get a villain who is basically a stand-in for Loki, only with none of the charisma.



All that being said, "Guardians of the Galaxy" looks gorgeous. The design of the world in which the characters live is fantastic. I feel like I'm damning with faint praise here (just like when I said that "Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" was better than "Battle for the Planet of the Apes"), but it has to be said that "Guardians of the Galaxy" comes across rather like a Star Wars movie and, to my mind, it wipes the floor with the Star Wars prequels. We see a variety of awesomely designed environments building a full world in which the characters can exist with flying vehicles and technology for them to use.



Sadly the characters themselves seem incomplete. It seems to me that the more important the characters were, the less interesting they were. The big surprise actually was Groot the humanoid tree-person. Actually one reason why he wasn't as goofy as I'd been expecting is because he's basically Swamp Thing. Sure, he's more like Swamp Thing before John Constantine comes along to tell him he's essentially a nature god, but there's still time for Groot to develop that way. Marvel actually have their own more clear-cut Swamp Thing clone, but that's Man Thing (a name I cannot imagine catching on) and he's already had one of their least impressive movie outings. Anyway, the variety of plant-based powers exhibited by Groot is by far the most creative element of the film. And he's not really the most central of the characters.

Click here for the rest of the review...
universetoday August 20 2014, 18:42

How Watching 13 Billion Years Of Cosmic Growth Links To Storytelling

http://www.universetoday.com/114047/how-watching-13-billion-years-of-cosmic-growth-links-to-storytelling/

http://www.universetoday.com/?p=114047

How do you show off 13 billion years of cosmic growth? One way that astronomers can figure that out is through visualizations — such as this one from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, called Illustris.

Billed as the most detailed computer simulation ever of the universe (done on a fast supercomputer), you can slowly see how galaxies come alight and the structure of the universe grows. While the pictures are pretty to look at, the Kavli Foundation also argues this is good for science.

(...)
Read the rest of How Watching 13 Billion Years Of Cosmic Growth Links To Storytelling (231 words)


© Elizabeth Howell for Universe Today, 2014. | Permalink | No comment |
Post tags: simulation

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stanford_encyc August 20 2014, 18:11

Erotic Art

http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/erotic-art/

[New Entry by Hans Maes on August 20, 2014.]
What is erotic art? Do all paintings with a sexual theme qualify as erotic? How to distinguish between erotica and erotic art? In what way are aesthetic experiences related to, or different from, erotic experiences and are they at all compatible? Both people and works of art can be sensually appealing, but is the beauty in each case...
universetoday August 20 2014, 16:12

A Piece of Vesta Has Been Stolen!

http://www.universetoday.com/114041/a-piece-of-vesta-has-been-stolen/

http://www.universetoday.com/?p=114041

The Meteorite of Serooskerken (Source: Sterrenwacht Sonnenborgh)

The Meteorite of Serooskerken at the Sonnenborgh Museum (Source: Sterrenwacht Sonnenborgh)

Calling all meteorite collectors and enthusiasts! There’s a hot space rock at large and, as Indiana Jones would say, it belongs in a museum. Perhaps you can help put it back in one.

(...)
Read the rest of A Piece of Vesta Has Been Stolen! (214 words)


© Jason Major for Universe Today, 2014. | Permalink | No comment |
Post tags: burglary, meteorite, museum, Netherlands, Serooskerken, Sonnenborgh, Utrecht, vesta

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universetoday August 20 2014, 16:11

Is A Sitcom Astronaut Hadfield’s Next Frontier? ABC Comedy In The Works, Report Says

http://www.universetoday.com/114038/is-a-sitcom-astronaut-hadfields-next-frontier-abc-comedy-in-the-works-report-says/

http://www.universetoday.com/?p=114038

Chris Hadfield all dressed up for another day in space. Credit: Chris Hadfield (Twitter)

Chris Hadfield all dressed up for another day in space. Credit: Chris Hadfield (Twitter)

It’s possible that Chris Hadfield’s best-selling book will become a sitcom! The astronaut who quickly became the world’s most-wanted Canadian last year, based on his amusing YouTube videos and stunning space pictures, is involved in production of a sitcom based on An Astronaut’s Guide To Life On Earth, Deadline reports.

(...)
Read the rest of Is A Sitcom Astronaut Hadfield’s Next Frontier? ABC Comedy In The Works, Report Says (276 words)


© Elizabeth Howell for Universe Today, 2014. | Permalink | No comment |
Post tags: Chris Hadfield, Expedition 35

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universetoday August 20 2014, 14:41

Remembering the “World War I Eclipse”

http://www.universetoday.com/113882/remembering-the-world-war-i-eclipse/

http://www.universetoday.com/?p=113882

Credit

Glorious totality, as seen during the recent total solar eclipse of July 22nd, 2009. Credit: Narayan Mukkavilli. Used with permission.

The paths of total solar eclipses care not for political borders or conflicts, often crossing over war-torn lands.

Such was the case a century ago this week on August 21st, 1914 when a total solar eclipse crossed over Eastern Europe shortly after the outbreak of World War I.(...)
Read the rest of Remembering the “World War I Eclipse” (1,115 words)


© David Dickinson for Universe Today, 2014. | Permalink | 5 comments |
Post tags: 1914 eclipse, 2017 eclipse, eclipse history, Einstein's Theory of General Relativity, relativity eclipse, when is the next eclipse?, world war one eclipse

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universetoday August 20 2014, 14:41

Watch A ‘Swan’ Fly Free From Its Trap In A Space Robotic Arm

http://www.universetoday.com/114035/watch-a-swan-fly-free-from-its-trap-in-a-space-robotic-arm/

http://www.universetoday.com/?p=114035

What does it look like when a cargo ship goes flying away from the International Space Station? This timelapse gives you a sense of what to expect. Here, you can see the handiwork of the (off-camera) Expedition 40 crew as they use the robotic Canadarm2 to let go of the Cygnus spacecraft.

“Great feeling to release a captured swan back into the wild last week,” wrote Alexander Gerst, an astronaut with the European Space Agency, on Twitter with the video.

(...)
Read the rest of Watch A ‘Swan’ Fly Free From Its Trap In A Space Robotic Arm (169 words)


© Elizabeth Howell for Universe Today, 2014. | Permalink | 2 comments |
Post tags: alexander gerst, Cygnus, orbital sciences corp.

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